Monday, October 7, 2019

October 2019 Check-In

October is my birthday month and this year more than ever it is a time of reflection. We lost one of our long-time Critique members and she will be greatly missed. Rest in peace, Connie Speth.

I recently taught my last travel-to workshop. It was a great workshop with a wonderful group of artists and I feel like I'm ending that part of my life on a high note. Thank you Pastel Society of Oregon. My interest now is in mentoring artists and I plan to do that closer to home.

Much of last week was spent video conferencing with artists Brian Bailey and Amanda Houston as the three jurors for the 35th IAPS Juried Exhibition 2019 Webshow. We juried 1,905 images down to 163 accepted. This process was quite an unmaking and collaborative experience and one I am grateful to have had.

This month I will deliver art to Aljoya Living to show with the Puget Sound Group of Northwest Artists (established 1928 in Seattle) and I will deliver work to Scott Milo Gallery in Anacortes for the November show. As always, many thanks to Kathy Khile for her continued support.

My work will appear in the Jan/Feb 2020 issue of Pastel Journal - thanks Anne Hevener for inviting me to contribute.

One of my publishers contacted me last week for new work available for future reproduction. While scrolling through work of 2019 I realize the majority of my art has been small this year: 35 small paintings. I plan to work larger for the remainder of 2019. Here are all the small ones.

House, pastel, 8x10 inches 
Plein Air ©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Geraniums, oil, 8x6 inches 
Plein Air ©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Ten Trails Black Eyed Susans, pastel, 5x7 inches 
Plein Air ©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Meadow #3, pastel, 5x7 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Meadow #4, pastel, 5x7 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Studio Garden, pastel, 7x5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Rock Creek Winter 2 - Revisited, pastel, 5x7 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Evening Meadow Light, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Evening Lake Light, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Meadow #2, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Meadow #1, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Red Farmhouse #2, pastel, 5x3.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Red Farmhouse #1, pastel, 3.5x5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Autumn Dusk, pastel, 6x8 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Carkeek Park Stream, pastel, 8x8 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Carkeek Park Trestle, pastel, 8x8 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Pond for Susan, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Porch for Susan, pastel, 8x8 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Aftermath, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
For Lee, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Study for Orange Teapot, pastel, 5.5x3.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Dreaming of Summer, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Blue Day, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Romancing the Light, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Roadside Attraction, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Violet Evening, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Violet Road, pastel, 3.5x5.5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Meadow, pastel, 7x5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Sunrise, pastel, 7x5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Glory Days - Revisited, pastel, 7x5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton
Sentience, pastel, 7x5 inches 
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton sold
Riverbank at Dawn, pastel, 7x5 inches
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton 
sold
The Ways of Winter, pastel, 7x5 inches
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton 
sold
Mindful, pastel, 7x5 inches
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton 
Hopes and Dreams, pastel, 7x5 inches
©2019Barbara Benedetti Newton 
sold 

Sunday, September 8, 2019

September - Back to Pastel

Cedar River Picnic, pastel, 25x18 inches
Soon I will travel to Roseburg, Oregon to judge the Pastel Society of Oregon's 21st Biennial Membership Show at Gallery Northwest. I'll also teach a 3-day workshop for members. After working in oil since last spring, it is fun to return to return to pastel. I found this piece of Wallis sanded paper in my flat file. I gessoed it to a yellow tone years ago. I completed a foundation sketch with charcoal and sprayed it with Lascaux before the application of pastel.








Wednesday, July 31, 2019

A medium from my past


When I was in art school in the early 1960's we used gouache for illustrations. Recently I have seen several accomplished oil painters using gouache for plein air studies. And, my friend Kay Dewar, is having great success with it so I thought I'd give it a try.

After a fair amount of searching in my studio, I found the 5-tube M. Graham set. White, Black, and three warm primaries and gave it a try on 4-ply rag mat using one of my small pastel studies as reference. I love that it is matte and that it doesn't have the plastic feel that acrylic has. After completion, I gave it two spray-coats of matte varnish and then a Dorland's wax medium finish. Hmmm...interesting medium.

Passage, gouache, 6x8 inches


Monday, July 29, 2019

The 40x40 canvas again

Busy days now that it is finally summer weather. Kayaking this morning, lunch with old friends today but I wanted to check in to let you know the 40x40 canvas is still in progress.

Monday, July 8, 2019

The 40 x 40 canvas

This could be a long story...I'll try to give you the short version. My artist friend, Sheila Theodoratos gifted me a 40 v 40 stretched canvas. I started an oil painting on it, it sat around drying, I lost interest in the subject. Now, I am painting oil still lifes for a Fall show and I'm eyeing that 40x40 canvas. I have oil paintings on both studio easels right now so first I had to figure out a way to attach the big canvas to my wall. That's another story; if you're interested how I did that, contact me.

 Here is the painting in progress that I'm no longer interested in. Backlit bouquet on our dining room table. Today I drew an X through the painting with a pastel pencil to help me layout the new composition, combined two reference photos in PhotoShop Elements, moved my Alla Prima Pochade next to the painting and began to paint again.

Using a hand-held plastic palette that came with my Soltek easel and a big brush, I began blocking in the new painting of the pink Begonia that sits on my table now.

This is how it looks now after about a half hour of blocking in the new work. Stay tuned.

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Percy is a ghost now

A couple days ago I posted about removing varnish. I included a photo of my gloves, turpentine, cloth and my painting "Percy Wiseman" (the name of the rhododendron). Well, I did it but after removing the varnish the surface had some lumps and bumps of thick oil paint so I handed it over to husband Jay to sand those down to a more uniformly smooth surface.


Percy Wiseman is gone and the wood panel is wonderfully smooth. This wasn't exactly what I had in mind but there are areas of this ghost image that are very exciting. I'll pull out my reference photos and perhaps I'll paint Percy again.

Thursday, June 27, 2019

More on removing varnish

Yesterday I posted about removing Gamvar varnish to repaint one of my older paintings. Today I noticed "Percy Wiseman," a 24x24 inch oil painted last summer when I was enamored with the Dennis Perrin method. I learned a lot from painting in that manner but it was not a perfect match for me. I tried to remove the varnish with the Gamvar method then realized I varnished this one with Liquitex Soluvar. Today I removed the varnish with this method.


Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Saving my Orange

Months ago I painted my orange teapot with orange (fruit) and a candle. A fun exercise in orange but the painting has been moving around my studio without future plans. Today I removed the varnish - here is a video to show how that is done.    Gamblin Video How to Remove Varnish


Then, with the varnish gone, I began to paint on it again. I want to save the teapot and fruit; I want to lose the candle.

I painted over everything except the teapot and orange and found an orange cup and a pot of small purple campanulas to add.

After that, I left the painting on my easel for a few days while I was busy with other things. Today I took a large paintbrush with thinned white oil paint and dragged downward on the painting obliterating the awkward cup handle and the edges of the teapot. Added blue to the foreground and repainted the orange (fruit) with a large brush after I rethought the real subject of this painting. I don't know if it will ever be framed and make it out of the Studio but now I can sleep at night.

"Orange," oil, 14 x 11 inches